England to play Brazil in first-ever Women’s Finalissima

England beat Germany to win Euro 2022 in July

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England will take on Brazil next year in the first Women’s Finalissima.

Sarina Wiegman’s European champions will take on their South American counterparts at Wembley on 6 April as the two sides prepare for the 2023 Women’s World Cup, which will be held in Australia and New Zealand in July and August.

England secured their first continental crown with victory over Germany in July, one day after Brazil had secured their fifth consecutive Copa America Feminina triumph.

“The great games keep on coming for us,” Wiegman, who remains unbeaten as England manager, said.

“This time, we have the opportunity to welcome Brazil to Wembley and it will be another big moment after the Euros and USA match. Like us, they will be thinking about the World Cup next summer.

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“This is a chance to again test ourselves against another top 10 team in the world, an opportunity to win another trophy and give our fans something special to watch, hopefully in a packed out Wembley.”

First held in 1985, the men’s Finalissama, a joint venture between Uefa and Conmebol, returned to the football calendar in 2022 with Italy facing Argentina at Wembley in the third edition.

England last faced Brazil in October 2019, losing 2-1 at the Riverside Stadium in Middlesbrough.

The Lionesses were last week drawn in World Cup Group D alongside China, Denmark and the winners of a play-off group, and will begin their tournament against the qualifiers in Brisbane on 22 July.

Brazil, meanwhile, will compete in Group F, with Jamaica and France, who knocked the South American side out in the last-16 of the 2019 edition of the tournament, their confirmed opponents.

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